Delicious gluten-free recipes

Cooking with Maille: Fried Pickles and Baked Pork Schnitzel with Mustard Cream

Just before I left for Cambodia I was approached by Maille to develop a recipe as part of the Maille Culinary Challenge. I’m a fan of mustard, and especially Maille products so I jumped at the chance!

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Maille sent me two ingredients with which to come up with a recipe: pickled gherkins and mustard with white wine, lemon and garlic*.

Maille mustardMaille mustard

Although Maille is a French brand, I went back to my American roots for my appetiser: fried pickles, a popular dish in the American South.

Cooking with Maille: Fried Pickles and Baked Pork Schnitzel with Mustard Cream
 
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Cook time
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Using some classic French ingredients, I've taken some inspiration from the American South with this fried pickle recipe.
Author:
Recipe type: Main
Cuisine: American
Serves: 4 Portions
Ingredients
  • 105g (or half a jar) of Maille ‘le Mini Recette Gourmande’ extra small gherkins
  • 100g plain flour
  • 2 large eggs
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. First, drain the pickles from the water and set to one side.
  2. Crack the eggs in a cup and whisk briefly, and season a plate full of flour with salt and pepper.
  3. Dip each pickle and onion into the egg mixture, before coating with the flour and setting on the plate. This will create the batter for the pickles.
  4. There is no need to overly season as the pickles already have quite a strong flavour.
  5. Once that is complete, heat the olive oil in a frying pan to a medium heat, and fry each pickle.
  6. Fry each pickle for no longer than 8 minutes, or until the batter becomes golden.
  7. The richer in colour the better, as it will have more flavour and be crispier – similar to tempura batter. Once golden, place each pickle on a paper towel to drain the excess oil.
  8. Serve dipped with mayonnaise.

Fried picklesFried pickles2014-04-19 08.19.44Fried Pickles

This dish is a real crowd-pleaser as the batter takes the sour edge off of the pickles – even those who aren’t a fan of gherkins can’t resist how delicious and flavourful these are, especially when dipped in creamy mayo! These will be great for any superbowl party or summer barbecue, and are best served hot. I had mine with a glass of rosé, but they are also good with pint of beer!

For the main course I went down a German route with a baked pork schnitzel with mustard cream. I decided to go for the healthier option of baking the pork, but if you want to be extra naughty you can fry these too.

For this recipe, which serves four,  you will need:

* 4 pork chops

* 100g plain flour

* 2 -3 eggs

* 100g golden breadcrumbs

*150 ml double cream

* 2 tablespoons of Maille Ail et Citron Mustard

Pre-heat the oven to 200 degrees (with fan). Prepare a similar assembly line as you did for the fried pickle recipe: a plate of egg, seasoned flour and a third plate of golden breadcrumbs.

Baked pork schnitzel

Take each pork chop and coat with flour, before dipping it into the egg. Once the chop is coated with egg, roll it into the breadcrumb mixture until it is well coated. Repeat for all the pork chops, and set to one side.

baked pork schnitzelbaked pork schnitzel

Grease a baking tray with butter, and pop the chops into the oven, giving 15-20 minutes to each side. While the chops are baking, start preparing the mustard cream sauce. Add two tablespoons of mustard and the cream into a saucepan on a low heat, and mix slowly until smooth. My favourite thing about this mustard was the fact that it is already seasoned with lemon and white wine, so all you needed to add was some ground black pepper – really simple and really delicious. Keep stirring the sauce, making sure it doesn’t burn – there is no need to add anything to thicken it as it will do so on its own.

mustard cream

Take the pork chops out of the oven, and serve with a dollop of the mustard cream. This is a really rich sauce so a little goes a long way. If you are like your food saucy, substitute the cream for some creme fraiche.

baked pork schnitzel mustard creambaked pork schnitzel mustard creamServe with broccoli and mashed potato, and a glass of white or rosé! See what the other bloggers have come up with on Twitter with #Mailleflavours.

* Products provided by Maille.

Comment below, and be sure to follow me on TwitterFacebook and Instagram!

The Poor Girl’s Guide to Yakisoba

I cannot wait for February to end.

Mainly because it means that it will be March, and I will be on holiday,  but also because I’ve just looked at my bank account to see that my balance is horribly depleted (mostly due to my frivolous spending). Mercifully, payday is close by, but as I scour the kitchen shelves to feed myself this feeling brought me back to my days as a student, and what I used to cook at university.

My idea of fast food growing up was my mom making me yakisoba, or fried Japanese noodles. I always seem to have the ingredients for my cobbled-together, frugal version of this meal to hand. It is by no means the proper, traditional recipe (so please don’t tell my old-school Japanese grandmother), but it is cheap, healthy and tasty which is fine by me.

The first time I cooked for Mr. A, I attempted to impress him by making yakisoba. Unfortunately it’s not one of those dishes you can just leave on the stove and come back to – it needs constant supervision. At the time, I was too busy paying attention to him instead and all the noodles clumped together to make one super noodle. It was seriously embarrassing and Mr. A referred to it as ‘noodle surprise’. Luckily he lived above a chip shop in Manchester at the time so neither of us were subjected to this monstrosity.

However, I like to think that I have learned many things since my time at university and how to cook noodles properly is one of them. For this recipe, you will need:

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What you’ll need:
Packet of udon or rice noodles
Spring onions
1 tbsp of oil (I used sesame)
4 tbsp soy sauce
Dash of Worcester sauce
Egg
Mayonnaise
Dried seaweed, nori
Peas
Garlic

If you have bought dried noodles, start to boil them in a saucepan. Ready to cook noodles can go in towards the end. Once the pan has come to a boil, strain the noodles and the rinse the noodles with cold water. This will keep them from clumping up (and becoming Super Noodle, or Noodle Surprise). They will be heated through again once they are fried.

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In a frying pan or wok, fry the spring onions and garlic in a wok on a high heat with a dash of pepper until they are lightly toasted. Add the soy and worcester sauce, then turn down the heat.

IMG_7518Pour the noodles into the pan with the sauce and vegetables.

IMG_7521Stir through until each noodle is coated in the sauce, and add the peas. As you would with a carbonara, crack an egg into the noodle mixture and stir it through so that the egg is incorporated into the mixture. (If you are vegan, you can leave the egg out, it will not make much difference). Once the egg has cooked, dish out the noodles.

IMG_7523Once served, add a little mayonnaise and sprinkle the nori seaweed on top. The nori will give it a crunchy texture. I love nori. So much that I named my cat after it.

And there you have it! This dish is pretty versatile – it is easily vegan friendly (just leave out the egg and mayo), and if you’re one of those people who can’t accept a meal without meat in it then this is a great meal to have with bacon. Just use sparingly, if you insist on keeping the mayo in, too.

 

Wasabi and White Chocolate Cupcakes

A few years ago a woman named Naomi Moriyama published a cookbook called ‘Japanese Women Don’t Get Old or Fat: Secrets of my Mother’s Kitchen’.

I have absolutely no need for this book because as a Japanese woman I know the secret – copious amounts of sake and binge-watching Studio Ghibli films, clearly. All jokes aside, a lot of Japanese cuisine is very healthy, practical as well as flavourful – a theme I hope to explore more within this blog. Take wasabi, for instance. Wasabi is a type of Japanese horseradish, often served in the form of a paste. Historically, wasabi played an important role in the development of Japanese cuisine. The anti-microbial properties of wasabi were really important before domestic refrigeration was a common thing. This is part of the reason why it was served with sushi (top tip: nothing comes close to toro, a type of fatty tuna sashimi with some soy sauce and wasabi).

Wasabi has a hotness to it – if you have too much, you can feel it in your nose. It’s not the same heat you feel with chilli, and is more similar to mustard. It’s great for if you have blocked up sinuses, and they have even developed fire alarms for deaf people using wasabi. How practical is that?

Going back to Naomi Moriyama’s book here for a second – I have never read it. Only because I know that Japanese women do get old, just not like the rest of us. Check out this diagram below:

average_asian_woman_aging

Source

See? And in order not to perpetuate this stereotype further I’ve got a recipe here that’ll make them fat, too!

Wasabi and white chocolate cupcakes copy

I had a lot of fun making these white chocolate and wasabi cupcakes. Check out the link at Baking Mad for the full recipe! I ended up having to make my own paste from powder, something I’ve never done before – but it was so simple and actually quite relaxing. It felt unnerving and unnatural to put wasabi into a cake recipe – I’m so used to snacking on savoury wasabi treats like peas but the flavour went really well with the buttercream, which I find can be a little too sweet sometimes.

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Mmm. Spicy, sweet buttery goodness.

Poker Night Buffalo Wings

Last weekend I hosted a poker night at my house. I say hosted, as I didn’t end up participating – I don’t know how to play poker (at 22? how embarrassing, I know). This was somewhat of a surprise to my friend Nancy and her boyfriend, who felt that I had lured them there under somewhat false pretenses. So my Saturday night consisted of a group of neuroscientists, an engineer and a former paleontologist around my dining table, several pizzas and countless gin and tonics. It was a great success, something I’d partially like to attribute to my excellent buffalo wings.

The history of the buffalo wing is a bit unclear, but most people agree that it originates from Buffalo, New York. There was another American in attendance that evening, and I knew he’d appreciate a buffalo wing to go with all the San Miguels we’d bought for the night ahead. Buffalo wings are a great accompaniment for beer, and are easy to make in batches, making them the perfect bar food.

What You'll Need: 200g plain flour (or rice flour for gf) 1 tsp cajun spice 1 tsp chilli powder 1 tsp cayenne pepper pepper salt 150ml hot sauce (I used Frank's Red Hot) 50g salted butter plastic bag

What You’ll Need:
200g plain flour (or rice flour for gf)
1 tsp cajun spice
1 tsp chilli powder
1 tsp cayenne pepper
150ml hot sauce (I used Frank’s Red Hot)
50g salted butter
plastic bag
16 chicken wings

Pre-heat your oven to 200 degrees, and grease a baking tray, then set to one side. In a saucepan, start melting the butter on a low heat. In a bowl, combine the flour, cajun spice, chilli powder and cayenne pepper, and pour into a plastic bag. Put the chicken wings inside the plastic bag, seal the top and shake until each wing is coated in the flour mixture. Some folks like to put the floured chicken into the fridge to marinade for half an hour or so, but I skipped this step as tensions surrounding the game were already high – no need for extra stress!

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Once the butter has melted in the pan, stir in the hot sauce and let simmer before taking it off the heat.

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Once the sauce has cooled slightly, dip each wing in the pan until it is covered in the liquid, then place on the baking tray. Once completed, pop the wings in the oven for 45 minutes. After the first 20 minutes, turn each wing over so each side crisps up evenly.

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And there you have it! Serve with a cold beer while watching your favourite team win at the Olympics (or, more realistically, whilst looking perplexed at all the sports you didn’t even know existed).

Eye-watering Chicken Satay Noodles

Some say that the key to a man’s heart is through his stomach. Others advise you to treat ’em mean to keep them keen. I like to incorporate both schools of thought in this recipe, just in time for Valentine’s day. It’s also a great test for weeding out potential mates – never trust anyone who can’t handle the heat!

I adapted this recipe from the Indonesian Chicken Satay offered at Rice in Manchester. It’s also a great way to sweat out a hangover.

What you'll need: 1 tablespoon of soy sauce 4 tablespoons of concentrated satay sauce 2 tablespoons of sriracha chilli sauce green chillies sesame oil udon noodles (or thick rice noodles) chicken (veggie substitute: firm tofu) onions

What you’ll need:
1 tablespoon of soy sauce
4 tablespoons of concentrated satay sauce
2 tablespoons of sriracha chilli sauce
green chillies
sesame oil
udon noodles (or thick rice noodles)
chicken (veggie substitute: firm tofu)
onions

In a saucepan or wok, heat up some sesame oil on a high heat. Add the chopped onions, frying until they are clear. Turn down the heat, and add the chillies and diced chicken. If necessary, start to boil the noodles – certain varieties can be popped in straight from the packet towards the end.

Fry chicken, chillies and onions

For this recipe, I used four green chillies. My objective, however, was to make my boyfriend shed a single tear with his first bite – I recommend one or two chillies to give the dish a nice kick for normal, caring human beings.

As the chicken starts to brown, add the soy sauce, satay sauce and the most important part – sriracha. The spicyness of the sriracha really complements the sweet peanut in the satay sauce – if you aren’t a fan of the heat, however, use sriracha sparingly. Remember to add half a cup of water if you are using a concentrated satay sauce, as I did for this recipe.

SRIRACHA! Nectar of the Gods.

SRIRACHA! Nectar of the Gods.

Thoroughly coat each piece of chicken with the sauce, and keep adding soy and satay to taste. Cook on a low heat for 10 minutes.

Adding noodles to satay sauce

Once the noodles are done, take the chicken off of the heat and stir in the noodles, coating each strand with the sauce.

Noodle Heart

Serve with a cold beer or a glass of milk. This dish is approximately 425 calories per serving.